Persistence

Persistence isn’t doing the exact same thing over and over. That’s easy.  You could do that without even thinking about it.  Instead, persistence is pursuing your Wildly Important Goal over and over, even when people tell you that you can’t do it. Even when business plan competitions tell you that your idea won’t work. Even when you gave it your all and a naysayer told you that your all wasn’t good enough.

Having persistence is not easy. In fact, it might be the hardest thing you could ever do. But sometimes you have to do it.  Especially if you believe in the work that you are doing.  Persistence is what happens when you have a goal you believe in, and you do everything you can to make it work. To prove to the naysayers that they were wrong.

I have persistence right now. What about you?

If not, maybe this video will inspire you.

Saturday, March 10th, 2012 Careers No Comments

You are not Normal

In business school we learn a lot about targeting. We think about our target customers: where they live, what they like, and what they want. And we consider ways we can get them to buy our product. We also think a lot about things like positioning statements, primary demand, and demand stimulation to optimize our launch strategy. Only one problem. After all this analysis, how do we know that our product will be adopted by customers in the market?

At Kellogg, we spend a lot of time thinking about how to sell our products in the market. That is to say, how to sell the right PRODUCT, in the right PLACE, at the right TIME. So we do a lot of research, analyze the people, run numbers on market size, and think a lot about what it is they want. Deep down at the core.

But there’s one fundamental problem with this. Especially when you’re looking at developing counties. The problem is that more often than not, we have no idea what the customer wants. We don’t know what type of detergent a mother might want in Brazil. We don’t know what type of clothing they might want in Bali. In fact, we don’t even know what types of television shows people prefer to watch in the US.

The problem is that there is a big disconnect between the people that make these marketing decisions and the consumers. Because MBAs and law students are NOT the average person. In large part our lives are different, we have the great privilege of going to schools like Northwestern and living in developed cities like Chicago.

Think about it. While MBAs from top schools might watch 1 hour of tv per day at most, the average person leaves the TV on for more than 8 hours.  While I have not eaten fast food in over 5 years, the average person eats it almost every day. And while job prospects out of our schools are in the six figure range, the average income for an entire family is under $50K in the US, and much lower all around the world.

The best thing I’ve ever learned in business school, comes from my Marketing Professor Julie Hennessy.  She told us over and over:  “You are not normal.” You don’t know what the customer wants.  Your job as a business person is to figure it out.

Friday, March 9th, 2012 Careers No Comments

Beat The GMAT Scholarship for MBA Applicants

Hi everyone, hope you are well. Just a quick post to spread the word about a new Beat The GMAT scholarship that launched just a few hours ago today. BeatTheGMAT is the largest social network for MBA applicants in the world, and the team out in Silicon Valley gave me news that now they are offering scholarships for appliants that are applying to business school.

Having spoken with the guys at the company a number of times, I now that giving back and helping others is a large part of the BeatTheGMAT mission. I can also attest that the guys there are really smart. So I think it’s great that they have come out with this scholarship program, and I highly recommend that anyone applying to business school also consider applying to this program.

See below for a blurb about the scholarship from BeatTheGMAT. .

And CLICK HERE to read the press release on the BeatTheGMAT website.

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Today Beat The GMAT launched it’s 7th annual Beat The GMAT Scholarship.  This is the seventh year of our scholarship program, and this year we are distributing six scholarships worth over $11,000.  Each scholarship package includes: a GMAT course, an MBA admissions package, and a GMAT test registration voucher.

Deadline to apply is April 23, 2012.  More info available at: http://www.beatthegmat.com/mba/scholarship

About Beat The GMAT 
Founded in 2005, Beat The GMAT is the largest social network in the world for MBA applicants, serving 2 million+ people in the last year. The website features many free resources for GMAT prep, as well as a rich applicant network through MBA Watch.

Wednesday, March 7th, 2012 Business School 3 Comments

Consumers don’t buy WHAT you do. They buy WHY you do it.

How do you explain why some people are able to achieve things that seem impossible? Why is Apple considered to be the most innovative company on the planet, year after year? And why is is that we will buy almost anything from them in spite of the price? And why is it that the Wright Brothers figured out the problem of powered flight, when more qualified and funded teams were competing directly against them? In one recent TED Talks, Simon Sinek gives his thoughts on why that is.

A few days ago I discovered a great TED Talks video that helped us answer a few of these questions. Given by Simon Senek, he discussed a pattern that he found in a few great leaders. The talk is good. The idea is simple.  And the concept innovative. And that concept is called is called the “Golden Circle”

For Simon, the circle looks like this:   “Why”, in the center, surrounded by “How”, surrounded by a larger circle, “What”.

Sinek uses this circle to explain why some leaders are able to inspire where others aren’t. He says that,

“Everybody knows “what” they do 100%. Some know how they do it. But very very few people or organizations know WHY they do it. And I don’t mean to make a profit, that’s the result. It’s the “why”, why do you do it, why do you get out of bed in the morning, and why should people care.”

And he argues that, “Consumers don’t buy what you do. They buy why you do it.”

And given that, the goal is not just to hire people who need a job, but who believe what you believe. Who do it for the same reasons you do. The WHY.

He went on to discuss to discuss the Wright Brothers and how neither Orville or Wilber had a college degree and how they had fierce competition that was more qualified and more funded.

In the end, the people who believed in the dream (the WHY), worked with blood and sweat and tears, the others, just for the paycheck. And that’s what made the difference.

Today, I challenge everyone (including myself), especially those in business school and in law school, to think a little less about the jobs we want and salaries we’ll make (the WHAT) and think a little more about why we take them (the WHY). To consider our deepest reasons for doing things and do better to couple that with the choices we make.  And maybe then, we will be able to put our deep passions to use and unlock our greatest potential upon graduation.

Tuesday, March 6th, 2012 Business School No Comments

The Ability to Zoom Out

Have you ever thought about what it means to be intelligent? Have you ever wondered why some people achieve such incredible things? And why some have the unique ability to do so many things well.  Well, a lot of it is the ability to see the big picture. And the ability to zoom out. At least that’s what Steve Jobs said in an interview many years ago as he was growing Apple into the empire it is today.

Steve Jobs said, a lot of success is the ability to zoom out. Like you’re in a city and you can look at the whole thing from about the 80th floor. And you can look down at the city. And while other people are trying to figure out how to get to point A to point B, reading their maps and not looking up and paying attention,  you on the other hand, are looking around and can see it all out in front of you. You can make connections that just seem obvious because you can see the whole thing.

In business school, we talk a lot about the big picture and about vision. But in practice, I see a lot of people scrambling around working on execution. Thinking about details. And forgetting the bigger picture. But at least people think about it sometimes.

In law school, it’s entirely about the details. Making sure citations are perfect. Catching the nuances of a case. And making air tight arguments in your briefs and memos.

In business school and in law school, it’s hard to STOP, take a step back, and head up the elevator. Let alone to the 80th floor. But I propose that you do you best to try. After all, it is something just about every CEO talks about, including the reigning CEO of the decade (Steve Jobs). It’s what they do as they juggle dozens, if not hundreds of decisions. And as they try to look around for the next game-changing product and innovation to their company strategy.

So, what are you doing to improve your ability to zoom out?

Sunday, March 4th, 2012 Careers No Comments

(Un)sustainability

Today, everyone in business school is talking about sustainability. In fact, it’s the staple question for any social entrepreneur in front of a funder. Is your business plan sustainable? And are your revenues sustainable?  In many ways I get it. It’s safe to fund social businesses that won’t rely on your funding next  year. But I also wonder how much weight people should actually be putting on sustainability. Instead I propose let’s look at a few things that are not sustainable to take action.

Imagine the school system on the south side of Chicago. Some of these failed school systems are totally unsustainable and need our attention. And if we don’t start working on them, the persistance rates will never get higher and the growing divide between rich and poor will accelerate faster than it is today.

Likewise, what about food portion size in the US and the resulting unsustainable weight issues of US citizens? This is a big one. Weight gain is a major factor in the development of diabetes, cancer and many other issues. When will we put a stop to this?

And what about the obvious one – global warming. Not only have the temperatures been rising for years but things like air pollution and carbon levels are radically changing. And if we keep up at the pace we’re on now, many people argue that the world be in severe trouble.

While you might debate me on some of the stats, you can’t argue that the trends are UNsustainable. So rather than spend 100% of the time discussing sustainable business plans, I’d be curious to hear more from mission-based organizations that want to work on these unsustainable trends. The cost of ignoring them is way too high.

Saturday, March 3rd, 2012 Business School No Comments

Entrepreneurship Lessons from Carter Cast

When students think about their post-MBA careers, they can go one of two ways. They can follow tradition and take really great jobs that people take every year. Or they can pursue something less traditional. On one hand, there’s merit to getting a job that provides structure and pays well, especially for some people.  On the other hand, there’s also merit to pursuing the entrepreneurial route. Not only is it a great learning experience but it’s always the best way to build skills while working on something you are passionate about. At least that’s what Carter Cast, former CEO of Walmart.com told me this morning.

Just minutes ago, I got done chatting with entrepreneurial guru Carter Cast. Carter came to Kellogg just months ago to help ramp up its entrepreneurial program. Like me, Carter is a Cardinal Wildcat – more specifically, a Stanford and Northwestern (Kellogg) alum. And so I had the chance to tell him more about what we’re working on, and he gave me a few great pieces of advice.

“Understand your purpose” Carter said. Know what your true north is and keep working towards it, even when you have to change the business model a bit.  He said this as I talked about how my business model was changing. No longer were we focusing on what we did when we had the idea, but our ideas are really different now.

He also said, “Be true to who you are.” Understand your skills and make sure they compliment where you want to go. He gave a story how he used to want to be an olympic swimmer and basketball player. But he came to find that swimming required training his upper body and basketball his lower body. So they were not complimentary, no matter how much passion he had. And that made success more difficult.

Carter also revealed the impact he wanted to make at Northwestern. That it was not just about getting a “leadership” title and being named Director of Kellogg’s Entrepreneurship Center but instead that he came here to teach people about entrepreneurial leadership.  He wanted to help emerging entrepreneurs to go out on the ledge.  In fact, the best advice he said, was “Who  cares if people don’t believe in your idea? Do it anyways?” He went on to suggest that we should learn from them when they challenge you but forget about them after talking.

Thanks again Carter for the great lessons. I look forward to hearing more about your experiences. And to staying in touch as we launch our website.

Friday, March 2nd, 2012 Leadership No Comments

Cory Booker: 2012 State of the City Address

Few politicians today are riding the wave that Cory Booker is. He’s doing great things not just in Newark but all over the US, all on a mission for change. His mission includes increasing economic opportunity for people in Newark, improving schools not just in New Jersey but all across the US, and improving the quality of life for children and families.

While there is still quite a bit of work to be done, Newark became a catalyst for change in the United States. And leading that change is Mr. Booker himself. A hungry and capable politician. A man with a big vision. And a pretty big following – 60,000 Facebook fans and 1.12M Twitter Followers just to start.

But don’t take it from me, take it from Cory himself, who says, ”

In 2011 we marked a groundbreaking year in Newark and, despite the global economic decline, we welcomed more businesses, enhanced programs for our residents and significant advancements into our City. While 2012 may present some challenges, we will approach these challenges in the same way we have in the past — through efficient governing and innovative solutions that benefit our residents and our City.”

Tonight (Thursday, March 1st)  you can tune in and hear more of what he has to say on corybooker.com. Booker will give his sixth State of the City Address from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center. Given his recent momentum in the political world, not to mention his selection as Stanford’s 2012 commencement speaker, it should be interesting to hear what his plans are for 2012.

Thursday, March 1st, 2012 Leadership No Comments

Happy Leap Day

One time every four years, we get an extra day. But it only happens once. Most times we forget that it’s coming, and it usually comes in the middle of the week. The question is, what are we going to do with the extra day this year. How can we use it to change the world for the better.

This year, Leap Year comes on a Wednesday. At Kellogg, that means we don’t actually have classes.  This means Kellogg students have a profound opportunity to engage more than usual. Contribute to a cause they are passionate about. Do something different. Try something they cannot do on March 1.

In the law school, it’s just another day of the week. But it doesn’t have to be. Students could make time to make it more. Especially 3Ls who skip more classes than they’d publicly admit anyways.

So today, just once this year, perhaps we should find a way to do something unique. To:

Work on something creative, care about someone else, volunteer, engage more, speak up, stand up for what’s right, contribute to a cause, create something new, and perhaps stop doing what’s typical and become inspired (Yes, I am talking to you JDs and MBAs).

Today, I’ll be working on how to show the world that Education Matters.  Anyone with me?

After all, it’s only for a day. And we’re already five hours in.

Wednesday, February 29th, 2012 Careers 1 Comment

Recruit for Careers You (Don’t) Know

One of the worst pieces of advise I’ve seen is a recruiter discourage someone that is an expert in one field from pursuing another field. The banker that wants to go into brand management. The artist that wants to be a consultant.  The juggler that wants to go into investment banking (yes, I’ve seen this at Kellogg). Or the tech entrepreneur that wants to run for office. In my view, the theory is that people should recruit for careers that are closely aligned with is not always good advice.

On one hand, the advice does make sense. If you have a relevant background, the firms will value you. They’ll appreciate certain skills you have. Understand you might need less training for the job. And have some certainty that you can figure out how to fit in. That can make recruiting easy and in some cases a successful journey for you.

On the other hand, they are also forgetting that a job similar to that is what took you away from work to graduate school. It’s a job that has dozens of people with your “relevant” background and will compete with you; but far fewer who think differently. And far fewer than that who are “daring.” Who dare to go into a brand new profession where the odds of success are much lower but reward might be higher.

Personally, I like the person who takes the latter option. And if he/she is smart, he/she will learn on the job. After all, we all were at a point when we need nothing about our jobs.  But we read up, found mentors, practiced solving problems and became better.  Now imagine doing that with a set of expert skills from another industry. You would be quite unique.

The result of doing something you’ve always done, is having an very high proficiency.

The result of doing something different, can sometimes be gamechanging.

Tuesday, February 28th, 2012 Business School No Comments

Jeremy Lin and Wildly Important Goals

Today, Jeremy Lin is on top of the world. He’s starting NBA games, television coverage, ESPN magazine, invitations to all the top events in New York City, and more fame and status than ever thought possible. It  all adds up to a life that seems perfect. One that hopefully continues for the entire season. One that could end up getting him a very large contract at the end of the NBA season. And perhaps most importantly, one that could end up inspiring millions of people about achieving Wildly Important Goals more than ever before.

The definition of a goal is: (1) the result or achievement toward which effort is directed; aim and (2) the terminal point in a race. We all have goals we want to achieve. We all have terminal points and results that we want to happen. This article from the New York Times talks about Lin’s goals and how he decided to work to achieve them.

One of my favorite quotes from the article says, “Jeremy Lin’s rise did not begin, as the world perceived it, with a 25-point explosion at Madison Square Garden on Feb. 4. It began with lonely 9 a.m. workouts in downtown Oakland in the fall of 2010; with shooting drills last summer on a backyard court in Burlingame, Calif.; and with muscle-building sessions at a Menlo Park fitness center.”

Jeremy Lin wanted more than the status quo. He wanted to take advantage of the opportunity when it came. He wanted to work hard when nobody believed in him. Another quote says, “Quite simply, the Jeremy Lin who revived the Knicks, stunned the N.B.A. and charmed the world — the one who is averaging 22.4 points and 8.8 assists as a starter — is not the Jeremy Lin who went undrafted out of Harvard in June 2010. He is not even the same Jeremy Lin who was cut by the Golden State Warriors on Dec. 9.”

In short, Jeremy Lin’s story is one of having a Wildly Important Goal, and then doing everything he could to make it happen. “Beyond the mystique and the mania lies a more basic story — of perseverance, hard work and self-belief.”  If you love what you’re doing and work incessantly to achieve it, then prepare to see it come to pass. If you are able to dream of the impossible, it just might happen.

CLICK HERE to read the article in its entirety.

 

 

Saturday, February 25th, 2012 Leadership No Comments

What’s the last thing you bought in an elevator?

Good question. I don’t remember the last time I bought anything in an elevator. In fact, I don’t think I ever have. After all, not only am I not in the market to buy when I’m going for the ride, but even if I were, I wouldn’t have enough time to make a decision, especially on big ticket items.  You only get a few seconds from the time you get on to the time you get off. So if that’s the case, then why do we practice elevator pitches? And specifically, why do people spend so much time on big ticket items?

In business school, we spend a lot of time thinking about our elevator pitches. What to say to the CEO if we see them. How to give a quick pitch to investors. And how to close the deal should we get the chance.

In my view, the purpose of an elevator pitch isn’t to close the sale. It’s not even to  give a description of you or your project/product. Not only will you probably not finish it on the “ride” (or during the time) but the person in the elevator probably won’t have time to hear you.

Instead, I propose that the purpose of an elevator pitch is something more nuanced. That it is to describe what you are working on in a way that  is compelling. To convince the person you’re with that they NEED to hear more. That they have to meet you again to hear the rest.

So I’ll ask one more time: What’s the last thing you bought in an elevator?

Now that you understand, maybe you should change your “elevator” pitch.

Friday, February 24th, 2012 Business School No Comments

Proceed or Pivot?

There’s a new word in the startup world today. That word is catching fire like burning sticks in a hot field. A it’s being thrown around more than any other word I’ve heard all year. And not just in business school but also more broadly now. In fact I even heard an undergrad senior use it today. Drum roll please … that word is. That word is Pivot.

So what does the word, Pivot, mean in the startup world? In short, it means to change direction. More specifically, to make a structured course correction with a business idea, and then to test a new hypothesis or new business model to see if it works better.

You usually pivot because you’re current idea isn’t working. Or because you got bad customer feedback. Or because someone else beat you to the punch with the old idea.

When this happens entrepreneurs ask, are we going the right direction? Is there still a market? Should we continue and persist with our old idea? Or do we need to change? And if they change (in a semi-organized way), then that is a pivot.

In my NUvention class, the word pivot comes up in every single class. Multiple times.  Annoyingly so actually.  But the idea in class is that we are continuously learning. And that the more we learn about the industry and our product, the more we can refine our idea and make it more compelling and that could take us in a new direction.

My NUvention project team decided to take a pretty large pivot when we changed products early in the class. It was a lot of work up front because we had to analyze a new market, find new customers, and talk to a lot more people. But things are going a lot faster now.

But if you think that sounds like a lot of work, it may have even been worse if we didn’t change (or dare I say, Pivot).   If there’s one things I’ve learned, is that’s there’s no worse thing you can do than to make the ill-informed decision to continue onwards, when the goal at hand cannot be attained.

For the current company/project I’m working on, we’re doing a small pivot. And we think it’s far more compelling.  Stay tuned to see if I am right or not.

What about you?  Proceed or Pivot.  Which one do you choose?

 

Wednesday, February 22nd, 2012 Business School 2 Comments

How Did You Do?

Just last week, the dishwasher stopped working as well as it used to.  Now we have to clean dishes a lot better before putting them in. And a few weeks ago, the same thing happened to the dryer. Sometimes we have to put clothes in two times before they dry now.  And it’s not the first time I’ve seen this happen in the building. I don’t know why it’s happening exactly, maybe it is because they are old. But either way, one thing is for sure. I bet the janitor who fixed them has no idea.

Like I said, I bet the janitor who put these appliances in has no idea what happened. My guess is that despite the complaints he will continue to confidently take the same steps in every apartment here. And that makes sense right? After all he has no idea that they stopped working. We didn’t tell him. And he didn’t ask.

I propose that this same phenomenon happens in business school. MBAs do homework assignments but often don’t know how they did after they finish. Professors don’t “clearly” tell us and we certainly aren’t in a rush to ask. It happens a lot in group assignments too, as one person from the team often gets the homework back in their mailbox, and the rest of the group forgets to ask what grade the group got. And by forgets, I mean they often don’t care to ask.

It happens all the time in classes with problem sets, especially when those assignments are a small part of your grade. TAs put the graded homework in your mailbox and you never check your grade. It happens with midterms and finals too. Sometimes they sit there for weeks before you pick them up. Often times until the following quarter when things slow down.

And perhaps it makes sense. We’re all busy people. And it feels really good to finish and to get through the hard problems. So why ruin that feeling with the possibility of a poor grade?

Perhaps this is why consultants don’t always follow up after they are done consulting for a client.  They get busy with other clients. Then they forget. And in some cases, they probably don’t want bad feedback.

On the other hand, this never happens to lawyers. One difference between lawyers and MBAs, is that law students always check their grades. And lawyers always ask clients how things went and if there is more work to be done.

Interesting dynamic.

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012 Law School No Comments

Passion

In business school, people talk a lot about their goals. Goals for classes. Goals for their careers. And goals for life after Kellogg. And it’s often the case that we assume our classmates have the same goals we do. That they’ll  end up in similar types of jobs and work in the same types of industries. But sometimes there are people that want to do something different, and do what they love. They find something they are so passionate about that they skip all the MBA opportunities to go after.

There’s no doubt that most of us have some level of drive and passion. After all, we would have never made it this far without it. We would have never made it through all the classes, got through all the interviews, and figured out how to be successful.

But for most of us, we speed up in the face of competition. In law school we ask, “how’d the rest of the class do?” In business school, we ask people how many cases they’ve done. We listen for someone breathing down our necks. And we discover that those breadths scare us to work hard and perform at our best. So we leverage it to do better. And sometimes even rely on it.

On the other hand, relying on that stuff can be exhausting.  And more importantly, relying on it means you’ve surrendered the ability to be a leader and an entrepreneur.

I propose that passion to achieve should not come competition but instead from Finding A Way. From moving forward when no one else sees a path–and holding back when the herd isn’t going where you want to go.

The great thing about passion is that it makes you do that.

Sunday, February 19th, 2012 Careers No Comments

Missions

“The mission is what you exist for, and everything is secondary to the mission. The mission is what will take people up the hill. … The mission has to be driven down through every level of the organization so everybody understands what we are trying to accomplish and is committed to its accomplishment. ”  The are the words of former Secretary of State Colin Powell. ”

As Colin Powell said, mission is one of the most important things you can have. It wakes you up at 5am when everyone else is sleeping (this is how I am ever writing this post), it helps you focus intensely on things when focusing seems impossible, and it keeps you optimistic even when everyone else tells you know.

In business school having a mission is critical. Because there are too many distractions and often times too much clutter. And then when you see half your class get swept up in the herd affect it’s hard not to go with them.

The same is true in law school. People all study for the same reason, to get the best grades, to make it to the best firm, to take on that big firm associate title, that half the class doesn’t even like. You see it happen every single year.

And it’s even more true in the startup and nonprofit worlds. When resources are limited. Skeptics are unlimited. And time is running out by the day. And you have to worry about what to do when you run out of funds.

So how do you avoid that? How do you focus on what’s right? How do you stay true to your mission? And how do you focus on it when all your incentives tell you to do something different?

I propose that the best leaders know how to do this and that they are intensely focused on the core mission. The know it. Breathe it. Live it.  Because without it, you just might get swept away.

So what is your mission?

If you don’t know yet, then I propose that you do your best to have a better sense before going back to school. Or before trying to start your next big movement.

CLICK HERE for my old post on business plans. In short, missions are better than business plans.

Saturday, February 18th, 2012 Leadership No Comments

Friends

I just realized the other day that I have not seen a fair number of my good friends at Kellogg for a few weeks now. Some of them are abroad for the quarter. Others taking different sets of classes. And some of them are still taking part in the recruiting process. Likewise, I’ve also been really busy working not just on school but also a new website that I’m building. In some ways, I think this is something that happens every winter of the second year. But it’s also something that’s got me thinking a lot about “friends” recently.

This quarter, I’ve been thinking a lot more about friends. Friends from the law school. Friend from Kellogg. And friends from the greater Chicago area. Given this is last year I’ll be a student here at Northwestern, it’s hard not to think a little about the people that I’ve befriended along the way. From those I’ve spent a lot of time with on class. Those I worked with over the summer. Those I worked with to plan a KWEST trip last summer. And those I’ve spent the last 2.5 years with in the JD-MBA program.

And it dawned on me. That a lot of my “good” friends are people just like that. People I share experiences with and work on difficult problems with. And I’ve come to find that it’s not typical to all-of-a-sudden make friends in the hallways; at least not good ones.  Instead you have to create friendships through a series of shared experiences. You work with them when the stakes are high. You hear more about their personal stories. And you see who they are at the core.

The problem is that in business school, you do actually make a number of your friends in the hallway, or at least the study room.  But time is limited.  The quarter system is busy. Recruiting is tough. And the Internet makes us more distracted than ever before.

One of the easiest things to do in business school is make new friends in the hallway. But one of the hardest things to do is keep them when things get really busy.

Thursday, February 16th, 2012 Business School No Comments

Stuck In Between

I’ve been thinking about a number of quotes recently. I’ve even been tweeting them more frequently. Well, one quote that I read this morning is “We’re hoping to succeed; we’re okay with failure. We just don’t want to land in between” by David Chang.  Not only was it interesting but it reminded me of one of my favorite quotes about taking risks of all time by Teddy Roosevelt.

Teddy Roosevelt has one of the best quotes of all time. He said, “Far better it is to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs even though checkered by failure, than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much because they live in the gray twilight that knows neither victory nor defeat.”

Teddy is very serious in that quote, just like David Change was.  But were you serious when you agreed. There are a lot of people out there that talk about this, many even say it publicly. But sometimes, not many people are willing to take the risk.  And few are willing to put themselves on the line to be wildly successful.

The problem is that this not only ensure that you won’t wait but more importantly it destroys the likelihood of being wildly successful. And in the end, almost guarantees that you will land somewhere in between.

So I propose that Teddy Roosevelt is right. That the greatest risk in life is not taking one. Perhaps wise words to at least one person on this Valentines Day.

Tuesday, February 14th, 2012 Leadership No Comments

Done Is Better Than Perfect

Imagine you have a choice. You can have something done fast. Or you can have it perfect. But you don’t get both. YOu only get to pick one. In that case, which one would you choose? What would inform your decision? And would it matter if it were in business or law? And would it matter who you were working with? Well, these are precisely some of the questions I think about on a daily basis.

One thing I’ve learned over the past few months, is that someonetimes you have to make this choice. Sometimes you have to get something done. And so DONE becomes more important to you.  But then there are other times you can do something to perfection. That the better the product the better off you are.

Lawyers tend to strive for perfect. They want to write air tight memos. Make arguments with no holes. And give you all the details even when they are not needed.

On the other hand, business people do the exact opposite. They want to get finished and move on. They want to create a MVP (minimum viable product). And they want to take on more activities. That’s what Faebcook believes. In fact, it’s one of Mark Zuckerberg’s main mottos.

So the question is, which one works best?

As for me, I tend to do both depending on the time. At times, I work hard on one thing to make it better than I ever imagined. This is especially true for things a lot of people will see (and judge). But in other cases, I don’t want to spend your time trying to make things perfect. That’s how I feel with my logo today for the new website I am working on. It’s also how I feel on some of the assignments I am working on and interviews (for my website) I am doing. Because perfect would required tradeoffs that might not be worth it.

If I had to choose, I’d pick done.

What about you? What motto do you live by? And what if I said you can’t say both.

 

Monday, February 13th, 2012 Careers No Comments

Day at Kellogg Round 1 for the Class of 2014 …

… just ended last night with a great reception in the city.  I hope you all enjoyed the weekend and also hope to see many of you on the Kellogg campus next fall.  To all of those who have been reading along throughout the year (and some for longer) before attending the weekend, congratulations again on being admitted. And to those of you who came up to met to say “hello” during the weekend, thanks for dropping by. It was a pleasure meeting you. Please do send me a note and let me know where you decide to enroll. Best of luck with your decision.

Sunday, February 12th, 2012 Business School No Comments

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Jeremy C Wilson is a JD-MBA alumni using his site to share information on education, the social enterprise revolution, entrepreneurship, and doing things differently. Feel free to send along questions or comments as you read.

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The contents of this blog are mine personally and do not reflect the views or position of Kellogg, Northwestern Law, the JD-MBA program, or any firm that I work for. I only offer my own perspective on all issues.
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